GEOL-3970 REMOTE EXPLORATION OF THE MOON & MARS Spring, 2019

 
Instructor: Dr. Michael Ramsey
Office: SRCC, room 509/511
Office Phone: 624-8772
Email: mramsey@pitt.edu
Office Hours: M/W, 1:30-2:30pm (or by apt.)

1. Objective: This course will focus on the technology and science of the recent and upcoming instruments & data sets of the Moon and Mars. NASA's current Moon to Mars Exploration Program has the overarching "goal of leading an innovative and sustainable program of exploration with commercial and international partners to enable human expansion across the solar system and to bring back to Earth new knowledge and opporunities." This has led to numerous missions from rovers to orbiters in the past and an aggressive future plan for instruments and humans in the future. These data have already led to several important discoveries of the geologic processes on both bodies. The past data and future plans will be the focus of this graduate-level, seminar-style class.


2. Lecture Time: F from 3:00pm - 4:50pm in SRCC 500. Attendance is strongly encouraged at all scheduled class meetings since this is a graduate-level, seminar participation style class.


3. Supplemental Textbooks: "Mars: The NASA Mission Reports" vol. 1 and vol. 2, by Robert Godwin (Apogee Books, 2000, 2004).


4. Course Requirements: The goal of this course is to foster academic discussion on the past, present, and future instruments, data, and science results returned from the Moon and the Red Planet. As such class participation and mastery of the journal papers will constitute the final grade. In addition, there will be opportunity to work with current planetary data in the IVIS Laboratory and, if time and data allow, the preparation of manuscript to be submitted to a planetary journal.

  • Project: The final project will constitute a group effort from the class with each student appearing as a co-author on a possible final paper. The successful completion of this research project will entail working together as a group to: (a) thoroughly understand the research literature, (b) identify a potential science question using remote sensing data, (c) devise a work plan for analyzing those data sets, (d) presentation of an hour-long research talk, and if time/date allow, (e) preparation of the final outline, manuscript and figures.


5. Course Web Site: This site contains the syllabus, announcements and assigned reference list for the class. Please check here for the most current class information.


6. Standard Policies/Rules: click here.


7. Relevant Web Sites:


This page last updated: Sunday, 13-Jan-2019 17:27:15 EST